Digestion

Food Safety and Your Health

Foodborne illness is caused by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. Many Foodborne illnesses tend to increase during the summer months because bacteria multiply faster when the weather is warm.

Handwashing is critical in preventing food-borne illness. One of the major contributors to foodborne illness is inadequate handwashing. USDA consumer research (January 2020-2021) showed that 56% of participants didn’t attempt to wash their hands during meal preparation. It is important to follow proper handwashing steps before, during, and after preparing food to prevent bacteria from transferring from your hands to your meal.

Food Temperature is another factor that can contribute to food-borne illness. It is important to keep your food out of the “Danger Zone” for too long; germs that cause foodborne illness can grow rapidly in temperatures between 40 and 140°F.  Always use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of your food to determine if it is safe to eat.

Cross-Contamination is what happens when bacteria or other microorganisms are unintentionally transferred from one object to another. The most common example is the transfer of bacteria between raw and cooked food. Raw meat and poultry can carry bacteria that cause foodborne illness. To reduce the risk of cross-contamination, USDA recommends using separate cutting boards: one for raw meat and poultry, and another for fruits and vegetables. Also, be sure to keep your fruits and vegetables away from your raw meat/poultry.

 

Source:

https://www.foodsafety.gov/sites/default/files/2019-05/summer-food-safety-infographic.jpg

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/news-events/news-press-releases/bring-food-safety-your-summer-vacation

 

Stop by Millers Pharmacy a Daywel Company to speak with our Nutritionist or Pharmacist about natural solutions for your overall health.

This information is for educational purposes only. Millers Pharmacy a Daywel Company does not claim to cure any cause, condition, or disease. Please check with your health care practitioner, especially if you have a medical condition, before starting or making changes to any diet, exercise, or lifestyle program.

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